23andMe DNA Test – Health + Ancestry Personal Genetic Service – 75+ Online Reports

July 19, 2017 - Comment

How it works? Provide your saliva sample from home. Mail it back to our lab in the same kit it came in- the postage is prepaid. You receive 75+ genetic reports in five key areas: Genetic Health Risks Reports: Learn how your genetics can influence your risk for certain diseases. 3+ Reports: Hereditary Thrombophilia, Late-Onset Alzheimer’s

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(as of September 20, 2017 7:18 am EDT - Details)

How it works? Provide your saliva sample from home. Mail it back to our lab in the same kit it came in- the postage is prepaid.
You receive 75+ genetic reports in five key areas:
Genetic Health Risks Reports: Learn how your genetics can influence your risk for certain diseases. 3+ Reports: Hereditary Thrombophilia, Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease
Ancestry reports: Discover where your DNA is from out of 31 populations worldwide – and more. 3+ Reports: Ancestry Composition, Haplogroups, Neanderthal Ancestry
Wellness reports. Learn how your genes play a role in your well-being and lifestyle choices. 5+ Reports: Deep Sleep, Lactose Intolerance, Genetic Weight
Carrier Status*: If you are starting a family, find out if you are a carrier for certain inherited conditions. 40+ Reports: Cystic Fibrosis, Sickle Cell Anemia, Hereditary Hearing Loss
Traits Reports. Learn how your DNA influences your facial features, taste, smell and other traits. 15+ Reports: Hair Loss, Sweet vs. Salty, Unibrow See 23andme.com/fda-info for important information about these reports. We do not currently offer reports on hereditary risks for diseases like cancer, heart disease and other serious health risks.
Quality Standards. Your DNA analysis is performed in US labs that are certified to meet CLIA standards – the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988. A CLIA-certified lab must meet certain quality standards, including qualifications for individuals who perform the test and other standards that ensure the accuracy and reliability of results.

Comments

R. Holzle says:

23andme vs Ancestry.com plus Promethease – updated I had DNA analysis from 23andme. My wife had DNA analysis from both Ancestry and 23andme. This review is my comparison of the two. I highly recommend secondary analysis of your results by Promethease, see further discussion at end of this review. Basically I like 23andme. If 23andme offers a lower cost ancestry only test, this is OK. For developing an ancestry tree, Ancestry.com is MUCH better IF you signup separately for Ancestry’s subscription search service.TAKING TEST and SIGNUP – Very similar test taking. 23’s signup was more secure. Anc’s was easier, but they automatically put my wife’s test on my previously existing Ancestry account.Waiting on RESULTS – Both send emails confirming sample receipt and when results were available. After logon, 23 provided step by step progress reports on the analysis process. The analysis process itself took about 10 days, including a holiday weekend. Total wait time was 3-4 weeks. Anc took 5 or so days longer…

Eileen says:

The Reason Behind the Mixed Reviews This DNA test from 23andMe gives you a huge amount of raw data. If you’re looking for medical information (not just ancestry), you are getting your money’s worth. However, due to FDA regulations, they aren’t allowed to interpret it for you beyond some very basic (and frankly unhelpful) reports. This is true for all DNA testing companies when it comes to medical information. The good news is that you can upload your 23andMe data to other websites and receive detailed reports. Promethease.com gives you detailed reporting for just $5 – everything from vulnerabilities to diseases, to genes associated with personality traits. Another commenter mentioned the MTHFR mutations, which are associated with many chronic illnesses. Geneticgenie.org will run your 23andMe results specifically related to these genes, and the report is free. And if you can afford it, the best way to interpret your results is to make an appointment with a genetic counselor, who you can find through NSGC.org. So, you’re…

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